War, Madness, and the First Valentine

The story of the first valentine is a thrilling story with a mad king, one of history’s most climatic battles, and poetry. It is a complex tale that involves two great kingdoms and all the machinations of a royal court. Part Shakespeare, part Game of Thrones, all history that deserves to be remembered.

The Great Sicily Earthquake of 1693

The Sicily earthquake of 1693 was the most powerful in recorded Italian history, and was so devastating that it changed the nature of architecture throughout the region. It is history that deserves to be remembered.

The Great Paris Moustache Strike of 1907

In 1907, class friction in France was coming to a boil. In defiance of the strict rules being placed on them from their employers and high-class Parisians, men across Paris were walking off the job, determined not to be humiliated any longer. A great strike had begun, and the working class men who embodied itContinue reading “The Great Paris Moustache Strike of 1907”

The Alsos Project and the Rescue of Max Planck

Max Planck is considered to be “the father of quantum physics.” Gerard Kuiper is considered to be “the father of modern planetary science.” The two met for the only known time during a daring rescue in May 1945.

The Edelweiss Pirates and WWII

Long before the start of World War II, there was a significant amount of resistance to the Nazi regime in Germany among the nation’s youth, including the colorfully named Edelweiss Pirates. It is history that deserves to be remembered.

The Real Count of Monte Cristo: Thomas Alexandre Dumas

Alexandre Dumas wrote some of the most widely-read books of all time, among them “The Three Musketeers” and the “Count of Monte Cristo.” Lesser known is that some of his most famous characters were inspired by his father, Thomas-Alexandre Dumas. The History Guy recalls the forgotten story of the man who inspired some of literature’sContinue reading “The Real Count of Monte Cristo: Thomas Alexandre Dumas”

Frederick Fröbel and the Concept of Kindergarten

Just three centuries ago in Europe, the idea of 4 and 5 year olds attending school with a system of learning would have been preposterous. Kindergarten is a relatively new concept and its creator among the most influential educational reformers of the 19th century. It is history that deserves to be remembered.

The Madness of King Ludwig II

Ludwig II of Bavaria was, by any standard, eccentric. He built fairy-tale castles in the nineteenth century, had imaginary conversations with Marie Antoinette, and liked poetry more than politicians. But whether he was actually mad was a mystery, as were the circumstances of his death. And his legacy has long outlived him. The History GuyContinue reading “The Madness of King Ludwig II”

Combat of the Thirty, A Tale of Chivalry from 1351

In 1341, John III, the Duke of the sovereign Duchy of Brittany, died, leaving some mixed instructions as to who was supposed to take his place. The war that would come afterward was closely related to the early stages of the Hundred Years War, and would lead to one of the Middle Ages’ best displaysContinue reading “Combat of the Thirty, A Tale of Chivalry from 1351”

Dynasties, Religions, Freemasons, and Pugs

In the late seventeenth century, Europe was in the throes of the Age of Enlightenment. The new ideas of rationalism contributed to the overthrow of an English King, the creation of modern Freemasonry, and a Papal Bull that all represented a massive shift in the thinking of early-modern Europe. The History Guy recalls the forgottenContinue reading “Dynasties, Religions, Freemasons, and Pugs”