D-Day Medics: Robert Wright and Kenneth Moore

On this day in history, June 8th, 1944, the fighting ceased around Angoville-au-Plain, where D-Day Medics Robert Wright and Kenneth Moore were treating wounded from both sides of the conflict in a church in France. Their service and heroism are history that deserves to be remembered.

Panfilov’s 28 Guardsmen and The Battle of Moscow

Featuring SABATON and their new single “Defense of Moscow.” https://music.sabaton.net/DefenceOfMoscow The Battle of Moscow was truly epic in scope, and represented a desperate effort by a people defending their homeland. One of the great legends of the battle- the brave last stand of Panfilov’s Twenty-Eight Guardsmen, stands as a symbol of the sacrifice of theContinue reading “Panfilov’s 28 Guardsmen and The Battle of Moscow”

The submarine that sank a train: the U.S.S. Barb

The History Guy remembers Eugene “Lucky” Flucky and the U.S.S. Barb, the submarine that sank a train during World War II. It is history that deserves to be remembered. The History Guy uses images that are in the Public Domain. As photographs of actual events are often not available, I will sometimes use photographs ofContinue reading “The submarine that sank a train: the U.S.S. Barb”

Shōkaku and Cavalla, a Confrontation of the WWII Pacific Theater

In June 1944, one of the largest, most modern and most important ships in the Imperial Japanese Navy, Shōkaku, encountered a US submarine, Cavalla, out on its first patrol. The History Guy remembers a WWII confrontation in the Pacific Theater. It is history that deserves to be remembered.

Georg Gärtner, the last German POW in America

In 1985, a federal fugitive chose to turn himself in after evading an FBI manhunt for forty years. The History Guy remembers Georg Gärtner, the last German prisoner of war in the United States. This is original content based on research by The History Guy. Images in the Public Domain are carefully selected and provideContinue reading “Georg Gärtner, the last German POW in America”

Mae West and the 445th Bombardment Group

The self inflated life preserver called the “Mae West” saved countless lives during the Second World War, and continues in service today. A vest sent by a viewer illustrates both the history of the life saving equipment, and the experience of the pilot who owned it. Special thanks to James Powell. Dedicated to Robert PowellContinue reading “Mae West and the 445th Bombardment Group”

Three Stories of the Dreaded “88.”

Of all the German weapons of the second world war, perhaps none was more feared by allied troops than the dreaded “88.” The gun, of which tens of thousands were produced, and used on all fronts throughout the war, resulted in some particularly compelling stories. These are three accounts of the effectiveness of the 8.8Continue reading “Three Stories of the Dreaded “88.””

Task Force 45 and the Italian Campaign

Created from AAA units in order to fill a desperate need for riflemen, though it would only operate for a few months of bitter fighting, Task Force 45 must be considered to be one of the most peculiar allied fighting units of the second world war.